Stuck in the Sound “Marry Me On Christmas Day” (2018)

Stuck in the Sound - Marry Me On Christmas Day

Self Released
Buy: Stream

French indie rock band Stuck in the Sound did an odd little thing back in January 2018… they released a Christmas single! “Marry Me on Christmas Day” throws me back to my college days listening to Travis’ The Invisible Band, as the vocals are quite pretty, and the lyrics equally sentimental. Nearly too sugary-sweet for my older, crustier ears, this understated song benefited from multiple listens, listens that reminded me of the pleasure a sweet song could bring.

Bottom Line: Hey, there is plenty of shit going on right now. Here is 3:30 of kindness to smooth out your wrinkles. Unfortunately, this track only exists on YouTube… but you know… there are ways to get it onto your mix, should you need to.

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The Slow Sliders “Merry Christmas” (2017)

The Slow Sliders Christmas

Self Released
Buy: Stream on Youtube

The fine folks over at Jean Luc Tobine’s Official Fan Club hipped me to this amazing track about a year ago… but I honestly didn’t know what to do with it. It is just such a massive song. The Slow Sliders are this wonderful french 4-piece who decided to jam on a fantastic Beach House-esque shoegaze Christmas song (“Merry Christmas”) for a whole hour, thirty-six minutes and fifty-five seconds. I would say that you could use this one song for your entire mix, but being that I am a Christmas mixer still attached to physical media and its constraints… that would be too long! The gentle rhythm combined with a mesmerizing organ melody, this song becomes a Christmas lullaby interrupted only by bursts of soaring, fluttering vocals. What I would give to hear a proper, 4-5 minute version…

Bottom Line: The pure audaciousness of this song. I somehow love it. I have caught myself listening to this one song for over 40 minutes before, and I still liked it. I’m a little baffled myself.

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Is this what a 4-minute version might sound like? 🙂

Chris Campisi Lifestyle Band “Wet Christmas” (2018)

Self Released
Buy: Stream?

Brooklyn Vegan hipped me to this song about boozing it up at Christmas, and so I tip my hat to you BV. The Chris Campisi Lifestyle Band is fronted by freelance production designer Chris Campisi – who I can’t find anything beyond a very impressive LinkedIn page, and a Youtube account (which features only one other track, “Marijuana”). I mean, this guy does not seem to have a band to his name, with the exception of the band that has his name! Ha! Well, I know my readers all love some good ol’ drinking Christmas songs, and this one aims to be the biggest. The drinking is bigger (as he is now drinking for two without you), as is the guest list. Featured on this song is Adam Green (Moldy Peaches), Jared Van Fleet (ex-Beirut), Delicate Steve (who has his OWN Christmas album out now), and Michael Tapper (We Are Scientists), who is not only on this track, but also directed the video. There is nothing deep here – the premise floats to the top on tiny bubbles of carbonation: he is getting drunk because you are gone. Classic premise, a great rocking backing track, and a singalong chorus. Swish, 3-points.

Bottom Line: Now let’s just have a little fun and enjoy this song, ok? It’s just a damn good time.

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Okay Kaya “Holiday Song” (2016)

Okay Kaya "Holiday Song"

Self Released
Buy: Stream

NJ->Norway->NYC singer/songwriter Okay Kaya (aka Kaya Wilkins) released this little gem on YouTube last season, and it was deservedly touted by my Christmas-music-blogger-in-arms Christmas-A-GoGo. Her voice is beautiful, yet with a mournful quality, and the message, while not your typical cheery Christmas romp, is most certainly relatable. My favorite line is, “I want to talk, I want to talk, I don’t want to talk, I want to talk loud and confidently.” There is something refreshing to the honesty found in the struggle embedded in the lyrics. I don’t think I’m far off-base to say that a quick glance at the central premise of this song might lead a listener to quickly dismiss it (as I think it would be terrible as either the pop-punk or twee song I imagined in my head), the line “All I want for Christmas is therapy,” threatens to be both trite and precious in equal parts, but Okay Kaya does a wonderful job to fully develop this song into a beautiful and complicated view of the other side of Christmas.

Bottom Line: Okay Kaya built upon a concept that I was almost reflexively suspicious of, and made me a believer.

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